Barbells and Bone Broth Podcast - Season 2 - Foundational Self-Care

Human beings have been connected with nature since our very beginning. Most of us crave some sort of natural setting (waves on the shore, hiking in the woods, brunch outside).

But getting outside is more than just an indulgence – it’s an essential aspect of self-care.

Listen as Kelsey shares with Heather what she’s learned about getting outside for self-care!

If you have questions, please send them to barbellsandbonebrothpodcast@gmail.com.

Catch up with Kelsey:
ignitenourishthrive.com
@kelseyalbers

Get to know Heather:
heatherhamannwellness.com
@heathervhamann

Be sure to like and subscribe on your preferred podcast platform!


For Self-Care, Go Outside!

Human beings have been connected with nature since our very beginning. Most of us crave some sort of natural setting (waves on the shore, hiking in the woods, brunch outside). But getting outside is more than just an indulgence – it’s an essential aspect of self-care. Listen as Kelsey shares with Heather what she’s learned about getting outside for self-care!

LISTEN HERE:

Barbells and Bone Broth: Season 2, Episode 3

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HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS EPISODE:

  • Why would you consider nature self-care?
    • Human beings are deeply connected to nature and that’s why it is a form of self-care and justice.
    • In the past 100 years, we started to eat processed foods and industrialize. We broke that connection and most of us yearn to have some sort of reconnection with nature.
    • There’s an awakening that comes with the feeling of sunshine on your face and skin.
  • Why are kids not going outside as much?
    • There is a big fear of kids being abducted, but there are actually fewer abductions happening now than there used to be. The fear comes from a 24-hour news cycle and a Facebook feed that you can find out about abductions immediately. 
    • There is also a fear of somebody driving by and seeing him playing outside and calling the authorities because I have “neglected my child”.
    • America has become a very litigious society.  We don’t want our kids to be hurt by someone else, and we don’t want our kids to hurt someone else. As a property owner, we don’t want kids that don’t belong to us on our property because what if they get hurt.
  • What is grounding? And does it really help?
    • Grounding is essentially putting your skin on or grasped on the earth. 
    • I recommend walking around barefoot in the grass as much as you can and listening. It increases your connection to Earth and helps you feel calm. Being barefoot makes me feel free.
  • Can you explain the comparison between human beings and plants that have been grown in a greenhouse?
    • A greenhouse is a place where plant seedlings can be grown sheltered from extreme temperatures and wind. But before they can be planted outside or go outside they have to be hardened off. They need to slowly go outside and they need to be made to withstand natural elements. 
    • For somebody who doesn’t enjoy nature or for children who haven’t spent much time in nature, you kind of need to harden yourself off to at first nature may not be comfortable at first. But self-care isn’t always comfortable either.
  • What would you say to people who inevitably are thinking I just don’t have time?
    • Identify categories of need that we have in our lives for our purposes of self-care taking care of ourselves and it’s things like movement, community, family, nature, neutral, like nutrients. Take these things and stack them in order of priority.
    • It all counts and it doesn’t have to be a huge event. pick one thing right now that you can do that increases your outside time.
    • Add the filter if you’re wanting to get outside more, add the filter of “can I do this outside?” or “how can I do this outside?” because the answer is usually yes.
  • Any other tips on what to do when we’re outdoors?
    • Sit in a spot outside that you visit daily and you’ll begin to observe changing seasons. 
    • When you see something in nature do something called minds-eye and put yourself in that animal or thing and ask yourself questions from the perspective of the animal or thing. It’s a practice of empathy and awareness and it deepens that connection with nature.

Do you have questions or comments about this episode?

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